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Aaron Gorovitz Papers

 Collection
Identifier: P-87

Scope and Content Note

This collection contains Aaron Gorovitz's sermons and marriage records, as well as a selection of photocopied newspaper clippings.

Note: The sermons are written in Hebrew. One manuscript volume has been noted as missing from this collection.

Dates

  • undated, 1910-1956

Creator

Language of Materials

The collection is in English and Hebrew.

Access Restrictions

This collection is open for researcher use. Please contact us to request access or to make an appointment to view this collection at jhcreference@nehgs.org.

Use Restrictions

There may be some restrictions on the use of this collection. For more information contact jhcreference@nehgs.org.

Biographical Note

Aaron Gorovitz was born in Lithuania in 1870; he received rabbinical training and was ordained there. He immigrated to New York at the age of 22. Over the next fifteen years, he would assume rabbinical responsibilities in many U.S. cities. He was one of the founders of Brooklyn's Etz Chaim Yeshiva (later the Rabbi Isaac Elchonon Rabbinical College), as well as Manhattan's Yeshiva Jacob Joseph. He organized the St. John, New Brunswick branch of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, and served as a rabbi in St. John, New Jersey, North Adams, Massachusetts and Woonsocket, Rhode Island . He settled in Boston with his family in 1907.

In Boston, Gorovitz was a member of the United Orthodox Congregations of Cambridge and Somerville, serving as a rabbi to Congregation Beth Israel, Congregation Askenaz, Congregation Novay Zedeck and Congregation Atereth Israel; in 1924 he became rabbi of Roxbury's Congregation Sons of Abraham, a position he remained in until his death. In addition, he was a chaplain at Deer Island House of Correction in Billerica and at Massachusetts Memorial Hospital, treasurer of the Boston branch of the Council of Orthodox Rabbis, and Vice President of the Assembly of Orthodox Rabbis of the United States. An ardent Zionist, Gorovitz acted as Vice President of the Federation of American Zionists, a delegate for the World Zionist Conference in Switzerland in 1903 (where he voted against the Uganda Scheme), attended the seventh Zionist Congress in 1905, as well as serving as a delegate for the eighth Zionist Congress in 1907, and as rabbi for the Zionist Yavne Congregation in the West End in 1910. Aaron Gorovitz died in 1956.

References

  1. Sarna, Jonathan, Ellen Smith, and Scott-Martin Kosofsky. The Jews of Boston. New Haven & London: Yale University, 2005. Print.

Chronology

1869
Aaron Gorovitz born in Svir, Lithuania.
1890
Rabbi Gorovitz immigrates to America.
1903
Gorovitz serves as Rabbi to Congregation Bnai Israel in Woonsocket, R.I.
1903
Gorovitz serves as delegate for the World Zionist Conference in Switzerland.
1907
Aaron Gorovitz moves to Boston.
1907
Gorovitz serves as delegate for the Eighth Zionist Congress in The Hague, Holland.
1910
Aaron Gorovitz serves as rabbi for the Yavne Congregation in the West End.
1924
Gorovitz becomes rabbi of Congregation Sons of Abraham in Roxbury.
1953
Gorovitz makes his third trip to Israel.
1956
Aaron Gorovitz dies.

Extent

0.75 linear feet (3 manuscript boxes)

Abstract

Rabbi Aaron Gorovitz was born in Lithuania in 1870. He immigrated to New York at the age of 22. Before moving to Boston, he was one of the founders of Etz Chaim Yeshiva (later the Rabbi Isaac Elchonon Rabbinical College) and Yeshiva Jacob Joseph, organized the St. John, New Brunswick branch of the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, and served as a rabbi in St. John, New Jersey, North Adams, Massachusetts and Woonsocket, Rhode Island before moving to Boston in 1907. Until the end of his life he was rabbi of Congregation Sons of Abraham in Roxbury. Aaron Gorovitz died in 1956.

Physical Location

Located in Boston, Mass.

Acquisition Information

Acquistion information is unknown.

Processing Information

Processed by Margaret Whiteside, 2010
Title
Guide to the Aaron Gorovitz Papers, P-87
Author
Processed by Margaret Whiteside
Date
2010

Repository Details

Part of the Wyner Family Jewish Heritage Center at New England Historic Genealogical Society Repository

Contact:
99-101 Newbury Street
Boston MA 02116 United States
617-226-1245